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Lore Herman Pintus, My Mother, 1921-1989

Lore Pintus (1921) went into hiding with her parents during World War II. She was betrayed, arrested and taken to camp Westerbork. While her parents were being taken, Lore could stay in the camp until the liberation.

 

"It was not easy to have to live in hiding. We lived in complete isolation. It was summer outside, but winter was always inside. It was always cold there. There was a window, but with my dark appearance I was not allowed to see through it. I heard children playing outside or walking to school while we were locked up in our private prison. Every time the doorbell rang, nerves flew through our bodies. We were constantly on each other's lips. "

In 1987, two years before her death, the Israeli artist Lore Pintus compiled a book with memories of her time in hiding in the Netherlands. They were memories of "a world that no longer existed", as Pintus put it, written down in a book entitled "Heini". A reference to her twin brother Heinz Pintus, who was murdered in Mauthausen in 1941.

Before World War II, Lore lived with her brother and parents Lise and Erich Pintus in a large villa on the outskirts of Berlin. Erich Pintus was director of a company that traded in oil and was one of the top in Germany. "My father was very rich," Lore told an Israeli newspaper in the late 1980s. "We grew up in enormous luxury. We had fourteen rooms in our house, a car and a driver. Lavish parties were the order of the day. "

* a blog about Lore Herman Pintus

My mother and father, Arnon St, Tel Aviv, the 50s

Lore, self- portrait, 1980s

Lore, 1980s

Me and my parents, Arnon St, Tel Aviv, the 50s

Lore׳s Business Card

Homage to Lore by Nino Herman

Heini, a book by Lore Herman Pintus

Lore and Heini, Her tween brother, 
berlin, 1921

Lore and Heini, berlin, 1927

Lore's certificate of the V.G.A resistance group

De Vrije Groepen Amsterdam was a federation of resistance groups in Amsterdam during the last years of the Second World War. The VGA was formed at the end of 1943 to coordinate the mutual contacts between Amsterdam resistance organizations. The groups, of which about 20 percent of the approximately 350 members had a Jewish or partly Jewish background, concentrated mainly on housing and taking care of Jewish people in hiding.
Among other things, they were active in providing false identity cards, food stamps and financial support to people in hiding and resistance members.

Lore was making fake identity cards.

 

״Fear", a book by Lore, was written at the age of 22,  While hiding and working in the resistance group

Gabi and Yair, watercolor, by Lore Herman, 1983

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camp Westerbork

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